There is something about the seventies retro kitsch that is The Magnet that makes it seem right for just about any type of act that would not fill a bigger venue. Those who do not attend it too often always end up commenting on the Star Wars figures on display to whoever is checking the tickets before realising there is no mobile signal for them to send a picture message to their friends who could not (or did not want to) attend the nights gig. Those who have a few shows here under their belt seem to ignore them and go straight to the bar.

First up tonight are “context specific noise rock and heavy psych” outfit Bonnacons Of Doom. Their original context was The Liverpool International Festival Of Psychedelia. One memorable former performance was was at the launch of last years Psychfest which saw them play at 7pm outside FACT. A happening that caught the attention of a fair few drunken weekend revellers. Some of whom began dancing!

Follakzoid Live Liverpool

Follakzoid

Tonights set begins as always with guitar noise and feedback complemented by drums and gamalan gongs that build up to a crescendo. Kate Smith gives what seems like a non-lexical performance whilst clad in black as the rest of the band (minus Psychfest artist and drummer Sam Wiehl) wear some strange looking mirror masks!

Whilst there is not much available to buy by The Bonnacons, they have released a track on a split 7” with Goat as well as a limited edition single. Both on the fantastic God Unknown Records. An album is reportedly in the works. This reviewer cannot wait.

Tonight is the first night of a quite extensive tour for Chileian psych rockers Follakzoid and they make a point of saying that they are happy to be back in Liverpool. Whilst a band of this genre will never draw a massive crowd (especially on a Thursday night) there is a respectable number here. And they are all throughly engaged.
Dense and looped krautrock grooves are the order of the evening which is punctuated by some rave esq dancing and periods where the band play their pedals as much as their instruments. The band leave the stage to calls for an encore which go unanswered. Had they come back they could have held this audience for another hour without any problems.

Andy Sunley